Articles | Volume 8
Adv. Radio Sci., 8, 175–178, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/ars-8-175-2010
Adv. Radio Sci., 8, 175–178, 2010
https://doi.org/10.5194/ars-8-175-2010

  01 Oct 2010

01 Oct 2010

Estimation of the interference coupling into cables within electrically large multiroom structures

J. Keghie1, R. Kanyou Nana1, B. Schetelig1, S. Potthast2, and S. Dickmann1 J. Keghie et al.
  • 1Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the Federal Armed Forces Hamburg, Germany
  • 2Bundeswehr Research Institute for Protective Technologies and NBC-Protection, Munster, Germany

Abstract. Communication cables are used to transfer data between components of a system. As a part of the EMC analysis of complex systems, it is necessary to determine which level of interference can be expected at the input of connected devices due to the coupling into the irradiated cable. For electrically large systems consisting of several rooms with cables connecting components located in different rooms, an estimation of the coupled disturbances inside cables using commercial field computation software is often not feasible without several restrictions. In many cases, this is related to the non-availability of computing memory and processing power needed for the computation.

In this paper, we are going to show that, starting from a topological analysis of the entire system, weak coupling paths within the system can be can be identified. By neglecting these coupling paths and using the transmission line approach, the original system will be simplified so that a simpler estimation is possible. Using the example of a system which is composed of two rooms, multiple apertures, and a network cable located in both chambers, it is shown that an estimation of the coupled disturbances due to external electromagnetic sources is feasible with this approach. Starting from an incident electromagnetic field, we determine transfer functions describing the coupling means (apertures, cables). Using these transfer functions and the knowledge of the weak coupling paths above, a decision is taken regarding the means for paths that can be neglected during the estimation. The estimation of the coupling into the cable is then made while taking only paths with strong coupling into account. The remaining part of the wiring harness in areas with weak coupling is represented by its input impedance. A comparison with the original network shows a good agreement.